Sunday, January 16, 2011

An Idle Question for Francophones

What would be the French translation of "Ravenloft"?

13 comments:

Joseph said...

Corbeaugrenier, or so the internet tells me.

Matt said...

La Ravenloft, if old Looney Tunes can be trusted.

mikemonaco said...

Yeah, I know "Corbin" must mean "raven" because of the "Bec de corbin." EGG and his polearm nomenclature.

Houndin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Houndin said...

Well raven is corbin and attic is grenier, a balcony is balcon or galerie, so I would think that it would depend on what you think loft means. Personally I'd translate it as "Grenier des corbeaux" or "Attic of the Ravens" but then again my French skills are pretty rusty, I haven't spoken it a lot in a long time.

Michael Curtis said...

The various free translators online all produced something along those lines, but I was wondering if there was an "official" translation of the module released and if so, did they keep the name or was it too translated?

Michael Curtis said...

Nevermind. I see that according to the Acaeum, it kept the title in the French version.

http://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/modpages/foreign/i6for.html

Prince Herb said...

A raven loft must be a special building for the keeping of ravens, like a pigeon loft, but a little darker. The French for a pigeon loft is pigeonnier, and for a dovecote colombier. I suggest that a raven loft might be a corbusier ;-), but apparently the French would just call it an enclos.


Word verification : escher

Prince Herb said...

Actually, it would be corbeaunier, but that apparently sounds very strange.

tedankhamen said...

"Soupente des grands-corbeaux" sounds good to me, and I am Canadian. Remember, English has germanic roots, so can make a compound name like "Ravenloft" easily. French sounds more authentic with the "A of B - A de B" pattern.

If I have my ornithology corrent, a 'corbin' is a small bird called a 'chough' in English, a 'corbeau' is just a plain old crow, but a raven is a 'grand-corbeau'. Also, the 'grand' and 'soupente' both sound ominous, as if the ravens are giant and about to swoop down on you!

J'espere que ca vous aide.

Arkhein said...

This really has nothing to do with your question, but I began thinking in the wrong direction, and had an epiphany.

One could call a Bat Loft a Bat Attic, which could be shortened to:

Battic

And there was much rejoicing.

- Ark

anarchist said...

I guess 'corbeaux' is related to the Scots 'corby'?

French AD&D Player said...

Ravenloft first product to be translated into French was AD&D TSR module I6, IIRC it was in 1989. Subsequent Ravenloft products for AD&D 2d edition in French were all translated with Ravenloft as campaign world name. Perhaps for two reasons : Ravenloft was one of the most appreciated module for AD&D 1st edition, the name was known to every serious AD&D player then and I think it's really not easy to find a good translation. At the opposite, when the first Forgotten Realms product was translated into French in 1987, it was translated into "Les Royaumes Oubliés" as it was an easy translation. Ravenloft in French should give a strange thing, probably the important renown of the Ravenloft name after I6 publication is to my opinion the first explanation of a lack of translation for "Ravenloft".

A French AD&D player