Friday, January 29, 2010

Any Map Experts Out There?

I've been scouring several books for examples of "old time" maps. I'm thinking of doing up my hexmaps in a style other than the standard icons. In my search, I found this map of the Adirondacks:

Does anyone know if there is a specific name for maps rendered this way? I know I've seen others done in this fashion, so I'm assuming it must be a particular style. If anyone knows of a website or book that contains other similar maps, I'd be much obliged as well.

14 comments:

Joseph said...

Those are called "landform maps".

Back in 2008 I discovered this amazing post at the making maps blog that shows fifty different landform terrain types from the 1930's:

http://makingmaps.net/2008/04/03/map-symbols-landforms-terrain/

Is that what the sort of thing you're looking for?

Michael Curtis said...

That's precisely the information I was looking for. Thank you very much, Joseph!

The Grand Wazoo said...

wow what a cool page!

Koren n'Rhys said...

I absolutely love Raisz maps. For my own stuff, I use Mystara-style hex maps for utility, but I eventually want to draw Raisz-style stuff. If only I had an ounce of artistic talent...

I highly recommend you get your hands on a copy of his textbook. I got mine on Amazon about a year ago - not expensive at all , either.

1d30 said...

I was always curious whether those maps showed actual landforms. Meaning, is each mountain shape a peak?

The labeled peak in your example suggests that. But without a map that shows elevation bands to compare with, I'd never know.

Eldrad Wolfsbane said...

Once again gaming has brought me great knowledge!

The Rusty Battle Axe said...

I have some examples buried in my blog of landform maps I've created for my campaign in AutoREALM. From a technical perspective, I think they are about the easiest maps to make. They do lack some realism if you want to use them to plan actual encounters, but they also communicate information quickly to players. I use landform maps for my general maps (they are can be very pretty) and then I create more detailed maps as needed for adventuring.

James said...

Where did you find that map of the Adirondacks? I'd love a copy for totally non-gaming related stuff.

Anonymous said...

There are some nice old maps on this site. I have used the map of the old Gold Coast a lot. Nice detail once you zoom in.

http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~3660~430002:-Africa,-with-all-its-states,-kingd?sort=Pub_Date%2CPub_List_No%2CSeries_No&qvq=q:Africa+Gold+Coast;sort:Pub_Date,Pub_List_No,Series_No;lc:RUMSEY~8~1&mi=1&trs=10

Michael Curtis said...

Where did you find that map of the Adirondacks?

The map appears as the frontispiece in the book, "The Adirondacks" by Paul Schneider. It's copyright The Adirondack Museum, but there's no date listed on the map or in the notes.

Michael Curtis said...

There are some nice old maps on this site.

Thanks for pointing me to this site. You've just solved a problem I was wrestling with...

Jonathan said...

@Joseph -- OOOOOHHHH... totally bookmarked that post. THANK YOU!

Jape77 said...

One place you might want to check out is Strange Maps. It has nothing to do with gaming, but is an amazing source for historical maps, and the many ways the world can be looked at. Who knows what creative spark it might set off

http://strangemaps.wordpress.com/

Paul said...

I ordered a copy of that issue of Geographical Review on eBay. Studying the art first hand beats the jpg scans hands down.

Bonus: Comes with a great period fold-out Antarctica map for those chilling Mountains of Madness CoC games!